Cops ‘mauled’ by fellow NCOs question order dropping them from rolls

CAGAYAN DE ORO CITY (MindaNews/11 November) — The embattled junior police officers who claimed they were mauled inside a camp by their own senior non-commissioned officers said they will file administrative charges against “all police commissioned officers who were responsible for the issuance of their Drop from Rolls Orders.”

“We believe due process was not accorded us and our constitutional rights were trampled,” Police Officer 1 Job J. Seronay said in an interview Friday.

This was Seronay’s reaction to Police Regional Office (PRO 10) spokesperson Chief Insp. Regina Abanales’ pronouncement yesterday that Seronay and PO1 Nick Ryan A. Ampong “have been dropped from rolls for having incurred 30 days or more of absence without official leave.”

Abanales replied in a text message Wednesday, when asked if Seronay and Ampong’s request for transfer would be granted. But she neither replied to the text messages nor answered the calls to her today.

Seronay and Ampong have been requesting for transfer after their senior non-commissioned officers allegedly took turns in mauling them inside the headquarter of the Regional Public Safety Battalion 10 at Camp Gen. Nicholas Capistrano, Barangay Gusa, this city on June 22 this year.

Their battalion commander SPO2 Charles C. Osip reportedly ordered the mauling.

Dropped from the Rolls

National Police Commission (Napolcom) Memorandum Circular No. 2010-001, amending Sections 9 and 10 of Napolcom MC 95-017, provides “full opportunity to concerned PNP members who were dropped from the rolls to exhaust all possible administrative remedies to determine the merit of their dropped from the rolls cases and make rules consistent with the Civil Service Rules.”

In their website (http://www.napolcom.gov.ph/pio.htm#jun1110),  Napolcom vice chair and executive officer Eduardo U. Escueta said the amendment “prescribes that within three days from receipt of the Order of the Dropped from the Rolls, the concerned PNP member may file a Motion for Reconsideration.”

“The PNP informed this Commission that very few PNP members who were dropped from the rolls complied with this prescribed reglamentary period due to insufficiency of time to prepare a substantial pleading for the filing of their motion for reconsideration or appeal,” Escueta said in the statement.

He added in the statement that “in order to provide full opportunity to concerned PNP members who were dropped from the rolls to exhaust all possible administrative remedies to determine the merit of their dropped from the rolls cases and make rules consistent with the Civil Service Rules, there is a need to amend Section 9 (Filing of Motion for Reconsideration) and Section 10 (Filing of Appeal) by extending the period of their filing, and to allow the appeal of the Dropped from the Roll Orders of the Chief PNP to the Secretary of the Interior and Local Government (SILG).”

The memorandum circular gives a PNP member 15 days from receipt of the Order of Dropped from the Rolls, to file a motion for reconsideration with the authority who issued the order, which shall be resolved within the same period.

If the motion is denied, the concerned PNP member may file an appeal to the Chief PNP within 15 days from receipt of the order of denial. The Chief PNP shall have the same period to resolve the appeal.

If the Chief PNP denies the appeal, his/her decision may be appealed to the Secretary of the Interior and Local Government whose decision shall be considered final.

No order received

Ampong said in an interview Friday that they only knew they were dropped from the rolls from Abenales’ pronouncement to reporters here.

“How can we then file for a motion for reconsideration or appeal when we never even received the order of the dropped from the rolls,” he asked.

He added that if they were to be considered “awol”, then they should have received a return to work order under the “principle of due process.”

Ampong argued that their absences were not continuous because they were able to attend the annual general inspection at Camp Capistrano in September. He added that in the presence of representatives from Camp Crame and the Regional Internal Affairs Service they were called in the rolls.

For his part, Seronay said they were not absent technically because they only stopped reporting at RPSB 10—for “obvious reasons”—but still reported at Camp Alagar where they have been lobbying their complaints since the incident.

Violent police officers

Meanwhile, in a separate interview Friday, a retired police officer who requested anonymity for security reasons lamented what he called “too militaristic training and too violent.”

The source said that subjecting police recruits to “violent and traumatic excesses perpetrated by supposed trusted senior officers will produce police officers who will have a propensity for violence.”

“This will have a bearing on the quality of police officers we are fielding to our civilians. Instead of mauling them, they should be tooled for better investigation skills and working knowledge of the law,” the police source said.

“In our time, laws and ordinances were drilled by our instructors into memory. I believe that was why we had good investigators then,” he said.

“Our instructors in the police force should, instead, endeavor to produce friendly police officers, who are civilian in character, who can enforce the law without fear or favor in accordance with the Miranda doctrine,” he said.

The Miranda doctrine stems from the landmark decision of the United States Supreme Court in Miranda v. Arizona. The Miranda doctrine requires that: (a) any person under custodial investigation has the right to remain silent; (b) anything he says can and will be used against him in a court of law; (c) he has the right to talk to an attorney before being questioned and to have his counsel present when being questioned; and (d) if he cannot afford an attorney, one will be provided before any questioning if he so desires. (Cong Corrales/MindaNews)

M11order

Cops ‘mauled’ by fellow NCOs question order dropping them from rolls

CAGAYAN DE ORO CITY (MindaNews/11 November) — The embattled junior police officers who claimed they were mauled inside a camp by their own senior non-commissioned officers said they will file administrative charges against “all police commissioned officers who were responsible for the issuance of their Drop from Rolls Orders.”

“We believe due process was not accorded us and our constitutional rights were trampled,” Police Officer 1 Job J. Seronay said in an interview Friday.

This was Seronay’s reaction to Police Regional Office (PRO 10) spokesperson Chief Insp. Regina Abanales’ pronouncement yesterday that Seronay and PO1 Nick Ryan A. Ampong “have been dropped from rolls for having incurred 30 days or more of absence without official leave.”

Abanales replied in a text message Wednesday, when asked if Seronay and Ampong’s request for transfer would be granted. But she neither replied to the text messages nor answered the calls to her today.

Seronay and Ampong have been requesting for transfer after their senior non-commissioned officers allegedly took turns in mauling them inside the headquarter of the Regional Public Safety Battalion 10 at Camp Gen. Nicholas Capistrano, Barangay Gusa, this city on June 22 this year.

Their battalion commander SPO2 Charles C. Osip reportedly ordered the mauling.

Dropped from the Rolls

National Police Commission (Napolcom) Memorandum Circular No. 2010-001, amending Sections 9 and 10 of Napolcom MC 95-017, provides “full opportunity to concerned PNP members who were dropped from the rolls to exhaust all possible administrative remedies to determine the merit of their dropped from the rolls cases and make rules consistent with the Civil Service Rules.”

In their website (http://www.napolcom.gov.ph/pio.htm#jun1110),  Napolcom vice chair and executive officer Eduardo U. Escueta said the amendment “prescribes that within three days from receipt of the Order of the Dropped from the Rolls, the concerned PNP member may file a Motion for Reconsideration.”

“The PNP informed this Commission that very few PNP members who were dropped from the rolls complied with this prescribed reglamentary period due to insufficiency of time to prepare a substantial pleading for the filing of their motion for reconsideration or appeal,” Escueta said in the statement.

He added in the statement that “in order to provide full opportunity to concerned PNP members who were dropped from the rolls to exhaust all possible administrative remedies to determine the merit of their dropped from the rolls cases and make rules consistent with the Civil Service Rules, there is a need to amend Section 9 (Filing of Motion for Reconsideration) and Section 10 (Filing of Appeal) by extending the period of their filing, and to allow the appeal of the Dropped from the Roll Orders of the Chief PNP to the Secretary of the Interior and Local Government (SILG).”

The memorandum circular gives a PNP member 15 days from receipt of the Order of Dropped from the Rolls, to file a motion for reconsideration with the authority who issued the order, which shall be resolved within the same period.

If the motion is denied, the concerned PNP member may file an appeal to the Chief PNP within 15 days from receipt of the order of denial. The Chief PNP shall have the same period to resolve the appeal.

If the Chief PNP denies the appeal, his/her decision may be appealed to the Secretary of the Interior and Local Government whose decision shall be considered final.

No order received

Ampong said in an interview Friday that they only knew they were dropped from the rolls from Abenales’ pronouncement to reporters here.

“How can we then file for a motion for reconsideration or appeal when we never even received the order of the dropped from the rolls,” he asked.

He added that if they were to be considered “awol”, then they should have received a return to work order under the “principle of due process.”

Ampong argued that their absences were not continuous because they were able to attend the annual general inspection at Camp Capistrano in September. He added that in the presence of representatives from Camp Crame and the Regional Internal Affairs Service they were called in the rolls.

For his part, Seronay said they were not absent technically because they only stopped reporting at RPSB 10—for “obvious reasons”—but still reported at Camp Alagar where they have been lobbying their complaints since the incident.

Violent police officers

Meanwhile, in a separate interview Friday, a retired police officer who requested anonymity for security reasons lamented what he called “too militaristic training and too violent.”

The source said that subjecting police recruits to “violent and traumatic excesses perpetrated by supposed trusted senior officers will produce police officers who will have a propensity for violence.”

“This will have a bearing on the quality of police officers we are fielding to our civilians. Instead of mauling them, they should be tooled for better investigation skills and working knowledge of the law,” the police source said.

“In our time, laws and ordinances were drilled by our instructors into memory. I believe that was why we had good investigators then,” he said.

“Our instructors in the police force should, instead, endeavor to produce friendly police officers, who are civilian in character, who can enforce the law without fear or favor in accordance with the Miranda doctrine,” he said.

The Miranda doctrine stems from the landmark decision of the United States Supreme Court in Miranda v. Arizona. The Miranda doctrine requires that: (a) any person under custodial investigation has the right to remain silent; (b) anything he says can and will be used against him in a court of law; (c) he has the right to talk to an attorney before being questioned and to have his counsel present when being questioned; and (d) if he cannot afford an attorney, one will be provided before any questioning if he so desires. (Cong Corrales/MindaNews)

URL: http://www.mindanews.com/human-rights/2011/11/12/cops-%e2%80%98mauled%e2%80%99-by-fellow-ncos-question-order-dropping-them-from-rolls/


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