RAGE AND COURAGE: Mindanao under martial law (5th of a series)

Want create site? With Free visual composer you can do it easy.

DAVAO CITY (MindaNews/21 September) — On September 21, 2001, exactly 30 years after  then President Ferdinand Edralin Marcos issued the Proclamation that changed everyone’s lives, MindaNews launched “Turning Rage into Courage: Mindanao under martial law,” a book of essays written by Mindanawons from different generations, on their experiences under martial law. The book also included poems and songs of the period.

This year, on the 40th anniversary of the declaration of martial law, we asked several Mindanawons to answer six questions to help us tell the story of Mindanao and the Mindanawons under martial law.  Here are their answers.

TED KHAN R. JUANITE, 67
Iligan City
Technical Advisor, Lanao del Norte Peace Development Advocate, Inc. / Deputy Managing Director, Star Cluster Mindanao (consulting agency)

1.Where you when martial were was declared in 1972?
I was in Manila studying at the Lyceum of the Philippines.

2.What were you doing then?
I was a 3rd year college student studying Journalism (but later shifted to Psychology) and a member of the “First Quarter Storm.”

3. From whom did you learn that martial law had been declared?
From the student grapevine and the news print media.

4.What was the most dangerous thing you did under martial law?
To attend mass rallies on an almost daily basis and attend “teach-ins” organized by the radical KM and SDK groups.  To study the “Red Book” of Mao Tse Tung and other political books of the left like Herbert Marcuse, etc.

5.What was the funniest thing you did under martial law?
Yes, there were also a lot of funny things like singing Beatles songs with friends at parties despite martial law.

6.How did martial law change your life?
It led me to apply for a job at the UP Dept. of Asian Music and work among the Higa-onons in Agusan del Sur. I had to get out of Manila even if I was not a member of the underground.

VICENTE CIRILO A. IRIBERRI, 54
Cantilan, Surigao del Sur
Executive Director, Cantilan Bank Foundation, Inc.

1.Where were you when martial was declared in 1972?
In Cantilan

2.What were you doing then?
I was a second year high student at Saint Michaels College.

3.From whom did you learn that martial law had been declared?
It was the talk of the town

4.What was the most dangerous thing you did under martial law?
Military personnel entered our classrooms and we just look at them with terror and shock…And I remember the following words if martial law is mentioned: “one-man rule, dictatorship, oppression of free speech, fear and hopelessness” 

5.What was the funniest thing you did under martial law?
Night “jam sessions” (home dance parties) under the pressure of the curfew hours… LOL

6.How did martial law change your life?
Not much but there were some lessons learned: discipline, particularly on time management, the power of unity of action, etc.

EMMA Y. HOTCHKISS, 61
Cantilan, Surigao del Sur
Secretary/Treasurer, Nova Manufacturing and Trading
President, CARCANMADCARLAN Baywatch Foundation
Chairperson, Nagpakabana Na CarCanMadCarLanon

1.Where were you when martial was declared in 1972?
I was in Manila.

2. What were you doing then?
I just finished school, newly married; working for a small company in Manila; also pregnant with my firstborn.

3. From whom did you learn that martial law had been declared?
I don’t remember

4. What was the most dangerous thing you did under martial law?
Marched with my officemates against the dictatorship. Our company president was the publisher of a magazine that was anti-dictatorship. I totally forgot the name of the magazine now.

5. What was the funniest thing you did under martial law?
No answer

6. How did martial law change your life?
During the first years of Martial law, Marcos controlled the press and the media and for a while I believed in him. Disillusionment came and I marched the streets of Manila with my officemates to protest of his dictatorship. I became very vocal against Marcos. I left for the US in 1984 to accompany my sick brother for treatment in the US. I kept abreast with the developments through my husband and was connected to the EDSA revolution through him and my brothers who were in the Air Force. Charles Hotchkiss was one of the Sikorsky pilots who defected to Ramos’ camp.

Experiencing life during the dictatorship changed me. It made me too conscious of the value of freedom, equal rights and love of country. (More tomorrow. Those who wish to share their own answers, please email editor@mindanews.com)

Did you find apk for android? You can find new Free Android Games and apps.

Comments

comments

3 COMMENTS

  1. Websites worthy of checking out…

    the following are some backlinks to web sites that we backlink to considering the fact that we think that there’re worthy of going to…

  2. Online sites we Like…

    Any the moment within a while we choose weblogs that we read through. Outlined beneath are classified as the most recently released webpages that we decide upon…

LEAVE A REPLY

five × one =